Hello Tello Pilot!
Join our DJI Tello community & remove this banner.
Sign up

FAA RPIC/Part 107 . . . they don't "Expire"

BigAl07

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 23, 2018
Messages
51
Reaction score
39
Age
50
Location
Western North Carolina
This topic is possibly the one I get the most comments and Private Messages about so I thought I'd do a Write-Up so others can read and hopefully get a better (more accurate) understanding of this topic that causes so much confusion.

FAA RPIC/Part 107 . . . they don't "Expire"
Your RPIC/Part 107 (and Pilots License for that matter) don't expire. You merely go out of "Currency". This applies to Part 107 as well as other "FAA Credentials" but for the most part I'm focused on Part 107 and PPL.

"Currency" merely means you have met the criteria set forth by the agency to be able to exercise the privileges of the credential. Many things can lead to loss of currency such as:
  • Medical Condition
  • Required Test/Training
  • Age
  • Calendar Months

Your RPIC/Part 107 is good (if all over things remain constant) until the END of the MONTH 24 months after you become Current. It's the END of the MONTH that so many people don't understand so let's dig into that one.

In regards to RPIC/Part 107 (not Part 61) you become Current by taking/passing the initial test at a testing facility. The day you pass the test is when you become "Current". Let's assume you take and pass your initial test TODAY, March 1st, 2021. So you are good to exercise Part 107 privileges until the END of the Month 24 months after March 1st, 2021. This means you are good to fly (assuming all other things remain constant) until Mart 31st, 2023. On April 1sr, 2023 you fall our of Currency and are not allowed to utilize your Part 107 until you again "become Current".

If you took and passed your initial test or did whatever was required to become Current on Feb 14th, 2019, you were good to fly up until Feb 28th, 2021 (yesterday). As of MIDNIGHT last night your Currency lapsed and you'll have to do whatever is currently required to Become Current before you can fly under Part 107 again. Your Part 107 didn't expire, you're just no longer CURRENT.

* It's important to note that even though your RPIC doesn't expire, it can be REVOKED by the FAA.

Hopefully this will help shed some light on this "Grey Area" which seems to confuse so many.
 
  • Like
Reactions: umanbean

Walleye

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2019
Messages
98
Reaction score
39
So after 2 years and one is no longer current, what does one need to do to become current again? Retake Part 107 again? All the testing sites I'm aware of are closed because of Covid. I thought there was an online way do become current. Any thoughts?
Thanks!
 
  • Like
Reactions: BigAl07

BigAl07

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 23, 2018
Messages
51
Reaction score
39
Age
50
Location
Western North Carolina
So after 2 years and one is no longer current, what does one need to do to become current again? Retake Part 107 again? All the testing sites I'm aware of are closed because of Covid. I thought there was an online way do become current. Any thoughts?
Thanks!
Let's take this one question are a time:

Lapse in Part 107 Currency:
No matter how long you have let your currency lapse (as it's written right now) all you have to do is take the Recurrency Training and you'll be Current again. If you do that today (March 3rd, 2021) it will have to be the In-Person Test at a testing facility. Once the NEW Recurrency Training Module goes LIVE at Safer Skies Through Education - FAA - FAASTeam - FAASafety.gov you will be able to become Current only by that training module and not In-Person testing (and it's Free).

In-Person Testing Sites:
They WERE Closed for COVID-19 but most (maybe not all depending on State Health Mandates) are open to some degree now.

Online Currency:
There WAS an online extension for those who went out of currency "during" Covid-19 but that has since expired. There is a Part 61 online currency exam but it's for Current Part 61 (manned aircraft) Pilots only. Unfortunately many Part 107 operators have stumbled onto this test and did not take the time to read the NOT SO FINE print at the top of the page which clearly ( and not in fine print) states the following (bold/red added by me but other than that it's Copy & Paste) -
*******************************************************************************************************************************
Part 107 Small UAS Recurrent Course Introduction

The FAA has developed regulations to allow the operation of small unmanned aircraft systems (small UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) for purposes other than recreational aircraft operation. The rules are specified in 14 CFR part 107 and address UAS classification, certification, and operating rules.

This course is designed for part 61 pilot certificate holders who have a current flight review (in accordance with 14 CFR part 61.56) and wish to remain current as a part 107 remote pilot with a small UAS rating. References to “part 61 pilot certificate holders” specifically refer to holders of pilot certificates other than student pilot certificates. Part 61 pilot certificates include sport pilot, recreational pilot, private pilot, commercial pilot and air transport pilot certificates.

As a certificated pilot, much of what you already know about manned aircraft applies to the operation of small unmanned aircraft. This course assumes the learner has a remote pilot certificate and operational knowledge of 14 CFR part 61, “Certification: Pilots, Flight Instructors, and Ground Instructors,” and 14 CFR part 91, “General Operating and Flight Rules.” The course focuses on the knowledge areas of 14 CFR part 107 that are beyond the operational knowledge of parts 61 and 91.

Others may take this course as a self-study resource, including:

  • Holders of a part 107 remote pilot certificate who do not hold a part 61 pilot certificate (or part 61 pilot certificate holders without a current flight review or other provisions of 14 CFR part 61.56)
  • Aviation Safety Inspectors (ASIs)
  • Aviation Safety Technicians (ASTs)
  • FAASTeam Program Managers (FPMs)
  • Anyone interested in learning more about 14 CFR part 107
*******************************************************************************************************************************

So several (and I mean a LOT) operators who wanted to sneak under the wire to get their Part 107 Currency spent approx 2hrs (maybe more LOL) studying and testing for something they THOUGHT was making them current but in fact was just a PRACTICE test for them. If you don't hold a Part 61 license and you are CURRENT with your BFR that test is nothing but practice.

The above is a classic example of why you need to read and ABSORB everything the FAA puts on their pages in training and test materials. The DEVIL is in the DETAILS.
 

New Threads

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
5,108
Messages
36,922
Members
13,797
Latest member
Esquimen