Hello Tello Pilot!
Join our DJI Tello community & remove this banner.
Sign up

How to: Take interesting photos

sfs-archery

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 5, 2018
Messages
116
Reaction score
52
Location
Germany
Website
sfs-archery.de
Sorry for the bad english. Text was translated automatically and i just correct the automatic Translation :rolleyes:

After my first contribution to the topic video now the contribution to the topic photo :)

The Tello is very well suited to take aerial photos. The camera can take pictures with max. 5 MPix (2592x2936 pixels).

The boundary conditions are:
The camera is fixed. It cannot be zoomed or panned. If you want to change the alignment of the camera you have to change the alignment of the whole tello.

Remarks regarding the Tello:
In the official Tello app you can change the image quality between normal and high. Each time the app is restarted, the setting returns to "normal". The app doesn't remember the settings you made.
Some smartphone-photo viewers have the problem that they cannot display the photos taken. Only a grey area is shown. Here is the solution to use another image viewing app.
If you transfers the photos to your the computer these have the file extension PNG. but actually they are JPG files which have only one wrong file extension. Therefore, some image processing programs will return an error when trying to open such a PNG file. Here it is enough to rename the image file from PNG to JPG.
The camera reacts very sensitively to backlighting. There one gets fast flares into the pictures. This can ruin the picture. But you can also use it for image design. (y)

A really big difference in quality between the "normal" and "high" settings can't really be recognized with regard to the image quality. Nevertheless I always set the image quality to "high". At least if I don't forget :)

Now let's get to the topic "shooting better photos" :cool:. The most basic topic is the image design. Therefore I would like to give in this article a small introduction to the image design.

The image design thereby the arrangement of the individual elements of a photo. This arrangement can be arbitrary (randomly provided photo) or can be arranged to strengthen the statement and effect of the photo.

The simplest possibility is to observe the basic forms of the image composition.

Rule of thirds
As a rule, the image is divided by 4 lines (2 horizontal and 2 vertical) into 9 rectangles of equal size. The important elements of the image are now located along these lines or on one of the 4 Points where the lines are crossing.
This rule is probably one of the most important design rules.
rot.JPG

Triangle
The arrangement of the elements of the image in the form of one or more triangles.
This arrangement is very useful if you want to group things in the image or if you want to give the image stability (or instability).

Quadrant
The single elements of the picture are positioned in rectangular sections of the photo. Thus you get a tidy picture structure similar to the view of a shelf. This type of design is very suitable for pictures with many visible lines and shapes.

Circles
The main motif is placed within a visible doer imaginary circle. Usually this Kries is in the center of the picture.
Thus one focuses the viewer's gaze on this element. Everything outside the circle becomes mentally "unimportant".

Vanishing points
Vanishing points in the image give the image spatial depth and also stagger the elements of the bidle in the foreground, main motif and background. In addition, vanishing points are very suitable for indicating the direction of movement of a motif.

Symmetry
The elements of the picture are arranged symmetrically in the picture. This arrangement is especially useful if you want to show a harmony of the elements or if you want to emphasize the equal importance of the elements.

Diagonal
Here the elements either form the diagonal lines themselves or run along these lines.
One fundamentally distinguishes between these two diagonals
Ascending diagonals: From lower left to upper right. This is rather associated with positive things / developments. "("share price rising")
Descending diagonals: From top left to bottom right. This is rather associated with negative things / developments. "("share price falls")

Halves
The picture and, if necessary, the determining element of the picture are divided into two halves. This creates a very clear and easy to understand structure for the viewer and gives the picture stability.

Examples to this rules.
There are a lot of internet pages that talk about single Points of this text. However I found only one page where the effects are shown in total.
Link: Geometric Shots
just click in the menue on the different kinds of designs like Triangel, circles,..
The example Pictures were screenhsots of Cinema movies. This means this Kind of ruels are not only for photography. You can also use them to improve your videos.

Regards
sfs-archery
 
Last edited:

sfs-archery

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 5, 2018
Messages
116
Reaction score
52
Location
Germany
Website
sfs-archery.de
this is awesome. thanks for sharing man!
Thanks !

The tello is not a perfect photo or video-drone but there are a lot of possibilities even with this drone to get good video/photos. And i think i will get the tello to the edge of their possibilities.:oops:
Recording sports videos in the forest. :giggle:

The tello is absolutely not made for it. :cry: But I will be able to work with it.

Is there anyone else here who makes sports videos with the tello?

Regards
sfs-archery
 

Storyline

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
84
Reaction score
28
Excellent post and a lot of those rules are good for land based photography too. My wife had a naturally good eye for taking a photo but when I told her about the most important thing - that Rule of Thirds her pictures got even better.

I have 3 quick comments about making good raw footage before editing.

1. Plan the story of the film you are going to make - even if it a short piece it helps to think first what you are going to do.

2. Do everything slower than you think it should be, and then go even slower again ! This is especially true when panning (yaw) the Tello

3. Look at youtube/vimeo for films and when you see one you like try to analyse the way they have taken the footage. You can then see techniques that always look good like filming a subject and then flying backwards and increasing altitude. There are many.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sfs-archery

sfs-archery

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 5, 2018
Messages
116
Reaction score
52
Location
Germany
Website
sfs-archery.de
Excellent post and a lot of those rules are good for land based photography too. My wife had a naturally good eye for taking a photo but when I told her about the most important thing - that Rule of Thirds her pictures got even better.

I have 3 quick comments about making good raw footage before editing.

1. Plan the story of the film you are going to make - even if it a short piece it helps to think first what you are going to do.

2. Do everything slower than you think it should be, and then go even slower again ! This is especially true when panning (yaw) the Tello

3. Look at youtube/vimeo for films and when you see one you like try to analyse the way they have taken the footage. You can then see techniques that always look good like filming a subject and then flying backwards and increasing altitude. There are many.
Thanks for this post. Your remarks are good. I hobby photographer and your remarks are helpfull to get better pictures / videos. Analysis photos and videos you like is very important. even photos you not like can give you important informations about things that are not workin.
regards sfs-archery
 

Storyline

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
84
Reaction score
28
Yes, photography is a mixture of art and science. If you are artistic and naturally take good photos you can still improve by learning about the science of why a person finds a photograph attractive. Similarly if you have no artistic eye you can take great photos by learning the rules that painters and artists have used for hundreds of years.

There was a famous photographer years ago (forgotten name) who had the discipline to take just one image each day. Some days were easy and he found a scene quickly but some days were harder and he would spend the whole day setting up one shot. No retakes!
 

New Threads

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
3,340
Messages
25,957
Members
8,620
Latest member
drikus